Saturday, September 22, 2018

Will China Find Africa's Population Growth Problematic?

Now and then we see stories about how China is expanding its influence on the African continent and how it covets and needs the natural resources located there. It will be interesting to see whether China will do something down the road to limit the expansion of Africa's population. Call it in an act of racism or self-preservation but it is very possible that in coming years China may find the projected explosion of the continent's population in conflict with its own interest and take some kind of action to reduce it. Having tried for years to control its own population's growth it is very possible China could develop a unique even harsh strategy to deal with this "pesky" problem.

OROB Will Create Massive Conflicts
China's "One Belt, One Road initiative" an all-encompassing and confusing project that was initiated four years ago will reshape world trade as it unfolds and the relationships China has with many countries and the African continent. Also known as OROB. It consists of two major parts or projects that are known collectively as One Belt, One Road, or Belt and Road, or the New Silk Road. According to Chinese state media, some $1 trillion has already been committed to OROB, with another several trillion due to be invested over the next decade. The plan aims to pump this huge sum of money into railways, roads, ports and other projects across Asia, Africa and Europe.

With this in mind, a potential conflict looms in coming years as Africa's population soars. A huge number of people may try to leave the region that suffers a history of political instability, corruption, and famine. It is only logical to assume many of those born there may decide to exit the continent in search of greener pastures and the promise of a better life. The exodus of millions of people from one area and into another is often greeted with hostility. As the door to Europe continues to close the road China builds to expand into Africa could become one of the few options left to escape the misery of being born in the wrong place at the wrong time. The unintended consequence of creating a backdoor into China will probably result in a harsh response from a government not known for its compassion.   

Going Forward African Population Will Soar
This article was inspired and in reaction to an excellent article by Taps Coogan that was published by The Sounding Line. Coogan states, "As we have noted on a number of occasions, Africa’s population is in the midst of a rapid expansion. For the first time in recorded history, the population of Africa is expected to rise from between 10 to 15% of the global population to nearly 40% by the year 2100. "The article which details the rapid growth brings into focus a major shift in the world's population points out that even before factoring in the negative effects climate change may create Africa’s agricultural yields are substandard and even if they can be brought up to the same level as the developed world, that won’t be enough to meet the needs of Africa’s surging population,  According to most estimates Africa will become increasingly dependent on food imports going forward.
 
Racism and tribalism are not qualities limited to western culture and throughout history, a lack of respect for the indigenous people in areas being developed has resulted in them being displaced or worse. An example is the fate of the American Indians that were not only pushed off their land but were killed in huge numbers. Genocide, the intentional action to destroy a people in whole or in part, is not as rare as we would like to think. In the future, it is likely mankind will add more than a few ways to accomplish this possibly without proof of the act or having to take responsibility. If this prediction comes to pass do not be surprised if the future of those born in Africa dims even further.


Footnote; The article below explores China's OROB initiative
http://brucewilds.blogspot.com/2018/02/chinas-bold-one-belt-one-road-agenda.html

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